EYES AND EARS

The eye, a complex and delicate organ designated for the mechanism of vision by means of structures that make it optically equivalent to a camera. It transforms light in information that reaches the brain in the form of electrical impulses. When we look at an object, the light coming from it enters our eyes and passes through a number of natural lenses – the cornea, the crystalline lens and the vitreous body, equivalent to the camera lens  – , and is then focused on the retina (the “photographic film”).

The complexity and diversity of elements that contribute to its functionality make it particularly delicate; if one then considers that the organ interacts with the external world, it is clear how vulnerable it can be to aggressions of different kinds (bacterial, viral, atmospheric, foreign bodies, etc.). The retina relays information to the brain by sending electrical impulses through a biological cable: the optic nerve.

 The protective function is taken care of by conjunctiva, eyelids and related glands. The conjunctive is a thin, transparent mucosa covering the front surface of the eye and the inner walls of the eyelids; its defensive function of the cornea is made possible not only thanks to a purely mechanical action (through a homogeneous distribution of the tear fluid), but also owing to the secretion of antibodies (IgA and IgG) and to substances with an antibacterial action (lysozyme). The eyelids, with their movements, contribute to adjust the quantity of light entering the eye, protecting it from too intensive illumination. They spread the tear film on the conjunctiva, allowing it to be constantly moistened and preventing dehydration. The gland system is mainly in charge of producing the tear film so as to obtain the right balance between the aqueous and lipidic components of tear fluid, thereby avoiding a too rapid evaporation which would expose the eye to dryness.

At times, the eye is not sufficiently equipped to protect itself from microbial, physical and chemical agents, allergens, foreign bodies, etc.; several problems can therefore arise, according to the variables and to the part of the eye involved.

The ear is the hearing organ and can be divided into 3 parts:

  • the outer ear, consisting in the earcup and ear canal, which collects the sound waves;
  •  the middle ear, formed by the tympanic cavity and tympanic membrane, auditory bones (hammer, anvil and stirrup) and by the Eustachean tube, receives the vibrations produced by the sound waves and conveys them to the inner ear;
  • the inner ear, comprising the labyrinth, formed by the vestibular system regulating the sense of balance and by the cochlea, sensorineural hearing organ, conveys the stimuli of vibrations to the brain and it is where the sense of balance is located.

This anatomical district is also sometimes prone to problems of different types, from the build-up of earwax to painful otitis media.

It is therefore vital to have effective natural remedies available to successfully treat the different affections, each with an approach targeted to eradicate the cause of the problem, using suitable means considering the specific anatomical district involved.